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Canada's Arctic patrol fleet won't be operational until 2025

La flotte de patrouilleurs arctiques du Canada ne sera pas opérationnelle avant 2025

2019-04-20

The Department of National Defence has indicated that Canada's fleet of Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships will be operational by 2025, according to the Maritime Executive.

The six ice-capable Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) will be used by the Royal Canadian Navy to conduct sovereignty and surveillance operations in Canada's waters as well as to conduct a wide variety of other operations. They can respond to search and rescue and humanitarian missions anywhere in the world, along with the capability to operate in Arctic waters in sea ice up to one metre thick. The ships will also be compatible with the Royal Canadian Air Force's new maritime helicopter, the CH-148 Cyclone.

With the official cutting of steel, the lead ship in the class, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, entered full production in September 2015. It was officially named in October 2018 and is anticipated to be delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy this year but won't be operational until 2020. The future HMCS Margaret Brooke, entered full production in August 2016 and is also expected to be delivered this year. Jetty infrastructure projects that are needed to support the new fleet in Esquimalt, Halifax and Nanisivik are underway.

The vessels, being built by Irving Shipbuilding, were announced in 2007 by then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper. They were anticipated to be operational by 2013, but the project has suffered delays. Critics have also questioned why Canada is paying around $400 million per ship when Denmark received similar vessels for $70 million each, reported the Ottawa Citizen.
In November 2018, the government announced it was building a sixth Arctic patrol ship to add to the five originally commissioned from Irving Shipbuilding. But it acknowledged that ship will cost $800 million, double the price of the other vessels.


La Marine royale canadienne se servira des six navires de patrouille extracôtiers et arctiques capables de naviguer dans les glaces pour mener des opérations de souveraineté et de surveillance dans les eaux canadiennes ainsi que pour mener une grande variété d'autres opérations. Ils peuvent intervenir dans des missions de recherche et de sauvetage et des missions humanitaires partout dans le monde, ainsi que la possibilité d'opérer dans les eaux arctiques dans des glaces atteignant un mètre d'épaisseur. Les navires seront également compatibles avec le nouvel hélicoptère maritime de l'Aviation royale du Canada, le CH-148 Cyclone.

Avec la découpe officielle de l'acier, le navire principal de la classe, le futur NCSM Harry DeWolf, est entré en production au mois de septembre 2015. Il a été nommé officiellement en octobre 2018 et devrait être livré à la Marine royale canadienne cette année, mais ne sera pas opérationnel avant 2020. Le futur NCSM Margaret Brooke est entré en production au mois d'août 2016 et devrait être livré cette année. Les projets d'infrastructure de la jetée nécessaire pour accueillir la nouvelle flotte à Esquimalt, Halifax et Nanisivik sont en cours.

Les navires, construits par Irving Shipbuilding, ont été annoncés en 2007 par le premier ministre Stephen Harper. Ils devaient être opérationnels d'ici 2013, mais le projet a subi des retards. Les critiques ont également demandé pourquoi le Canada payait environ 400 millions de dollars par navire alors que le Danemark recevait des navires similaires pour 70 millions de dollars chacun, a rapporté le quotidien Ottawa Citizen.

En novembre 2018, le gouvernement a annoncé la construction d'un sixième navire de patrouille dans l'Arctique, qui s'ajouterait aux cinq commandés à l'origine par Irving Shipbuilding. Mais il a reconnu que le navire coûterait 800 millions de dollars, soit le double du prix des autres navires.

 
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BC container truckers welcome new pay increases

2019-04-24

Vancouver, BC - Unifor says efforts are paying off for container truck drivers in B.C.'s lower mainland as the provincial government introduced a suite of changes that will make work better for more than 1,700 truckers and help to stabilize the industry, according to the union.

"Few industries need regulation as badly as the container trucking industry," said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. "It's hard to overstate just how much wage theft our members have seen over the years from unethical employers. We welcome the Horgan government's continued leadership on protecting hard-working container truckers."

The provincial government is implementing the vast majority of recommendations in the B.C. Container Trucking Commissioner's Rate and Remuneration report, including a 2 per cent wage rate hike and a commitment to mandate remuneration for all work-related driving by container truckers.

"Nobody should have to work for free," said Unifor-Vancouver Container Trucker Association (Unifor-VCTA) president Paul Johal, referring to the unpaid movement of empty truck beds. "Unifor made a submission to the Commissioner's rate review and impressed upon the government that fair rates will provide stability in Lower Mainland's port trucking industry."

Unifor says provincial regulation is a must in the industry, which has a long history of wage theft. Since the Container Trucking Act was introduced in 2014, more than $2.5 million in recovered wages and fines have been levied.
"Today's  (April 22) announcement sets truckers on firm footing for collective bargaining this summer," said Mr. Johal, who added that collective agreements expire on July 30.

Container truckers shut down Port Metro Vancouver for nearly four weeks in March 2014 as a result of wage undercutting by trucking companies and long wait times at the Port. Truckers went back to work after a plan was signed with the truckers, the Port, the BC government, and the federal government. The BC NDP government responded by increasing rates by 2.6 per cent in 2018, followed by today's announcement of a 2 per cent increase effective June 1, 2019. Unifor said it is optimistic that after all of the new recommendations have been implemented by the Commissioner, further adjustments to the rate tables will also result in higher wages for container truckers. (Photo VFPA)

 
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CTA finds breach in CN service obligations

L'OTC conclut à un manquement aux obligations de service du CN

2019-04-20

Following an investigation authorized by the Minister of Transport, the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) has found that Canadian National Railway Company (CN) breached its level of service obligations.

In September, CN announced its intention to impose embargoes on wood pulp shipments, several months before rail congestion and other challenges emerged in the Vancouver area, and imposed those embargoes in December 2018, rather than making every reasonable effort to deal with those challenges before unilaterally restricting the transportation of the shippers' traffic.

The CTA ordered CN to develop and submit a plan to respond to future traffic surges in the Vancouver area and to avoid, or minimize, the use of embargoes. The determination also sets out criteria for the lawful use of embargoes, including that they be imposed only on an exceptional basis, be targeted to address specific challenges, and be lifted as soon as possible.

The CTA found that Canadian Pacific Railway Company (CP) and BNSF Railway Company (BNSF), the two other railway companies investigated, had not breached their service obligations. As published in COS Weekly Newsletter 19 April 2019.


À la suite d'une enquête autorisée par le ministre des Transports, l'Office des transports du Canada (CTA) a conclu que la Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada (CN) avait manqué à ses obligations en matière de niveau de service.

En septembre, le CN a annoncé son intention d'imposer des embargos sur les cargaisons de pâte de bois plusieurs mois avant la congestion des chemins de fer et d'autres problèmes dans la région de Vancouver et a imposé ces embargos en décembre 2018 au lieu de déployer tous les efforts raisonnables pour relever ces défis avant d'unilatéralement restreindre le transport du trafic des expéditeurs.

L'OTC a ordonné au CN d'élaborer et de présenter un plan pour faire face aux futures augmentations de la circulation dans la région de Vancouver et éviter ou limiter le recours aux embargos. La détermination énonce également des critères pour l'utilisation licite des embargos, notamment qu'ils ne doivent être imposés qu'à titre exceptionnel, qu'ils doivent être ciblés de manière à relever des défis spécifiques et être levés dès que possible.

La CTA a conclu que la Compagnie de chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique (CP) et la Compagnie de chemin de fer BNSF (BNSF), les deux autres compagnies de chemin de fer faisant l'objet de l'enquête, n'avaient pas manqué à leurs obligations de service. Tel que publié dans la Lettre hebdomadaire du COS du 19 avril 2019

 
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