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Hapag-Lloyd rules out Arctic shipping

2019-10-09

McKeil Marine's Evans Spirit  won the International Bulk Journal's 2016 Ship of the Year Award during the IBJ's Salute to Excellence in the Maritime Bulk Industry gala awards ceremony in London, UK on November 21.
"It's a fantastic way to closeout our 60th anniversary year: having a vessel named after our founder, Evans McKeil, win this prestigious international award," said Steve Fletcher, President and CEO of McKeil Marine.
Acquired by McKeil in 2015, the Evans Spirit is a cargo ship with the shallow draught characters of a tug and barge; however, compared to a tug-and-barge unit, she can transport approximately 40 per cent more cargo about 50 per cent faster on a very similar amount of fuel.  She is in service throughout the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.
Evans Spirit was shortlisted for 2016 Ship of the Year competing with three other vessels: CS Bright, Mitsui OSK Lines, Japan;  Damen Shipyards, Netherlands; and MN Baroque, Swiss Marine, Switzerland. The award is presented to the owner, operator or builder of an outstanding individual bulk ship. Judged on operational efficiency, design innovation, safety and environmental protection, the Evans Spirit was selected as winner. (Photo Paul Beesley).

 

Hamburg, Germany - German shipping firm Hapag-Lloyd says it will not use the Arctic shipping passages which are now open as the sea ice in the Arctic is melting.
"Hapag-Lloyd does not use the Northwest Passage or the Northeast Passage as shipping routes right now, nor are there any plans to do so in the future," stated Jörg Erdmann, Senior Director Sustainability at Hapag-Lloyd.

With its stance on the possible route through the Arctic, the German carrier joins French container shipping company CMA CGM. In August, CMA CGM said that none of its 500 vessels would use the Northern Sea Route along Siberia as it would represent "a significant danger to the unique natural ecosystems."

"The particles produced by the combustion of carbon-based fossils and fuels contribute to global warming, which can in turn harm our ecosystems. As long as there are no guarantees that these passages can be navigated without negatively impacting the environment, using them is out of the question for Hapag-Lloyd, as well," added Mr. Erdmann.

According to Mr. Erdmann, the significance of the above sea passages for container shipping is still limited as the window of time during which ships can navigate through the Arctic region continues to be relatively narrow. At present, it would be difficult to use these routes regularly.

"What's more, since container ships operate in liner services, we must take a long and hard look at whether the time one might save from the shorter distances offered by using the Northwest Passage and Northeast Passage would result in genuine economic benefits, especially when taking into account the draughts of larger ships or the fact that ships would likely need to have the appropriate ice classes.

 

 

 
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