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Seaspan Shipyards delivers 2nd science vessel to Canadian Coast Guard

 

2019-12-11

 

 

VICTORIA,BC- Seaspan Shipyards and its 2,700 employees have succeeded in delivering the CCGS Capt. Jacques Cartier, the Canadian Coast Guard's newest state-of-the-art Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel (OFSV), the second OFSV delivered by Seaspan.

This ultimate milestone in the shipbuilding process took place exactly five months and two days after the delivery of its sister ship, the CCGS Sir John Franklin. These two ships are the first large vessels delivered under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the Government of Canada's 2010 plan to renew the federal fleet with ships built in Canada.

In addition to major partners like Thales Canada who are responsible for the vessel's Electronic Systems and Vard Marine, Seaspan's Platform Design partner, more than 600 Canadian small- and medium-size companies and their thousands of employees across the country contributed to this world-class vessel.

Measuring 63.4 metres, the CCGS Capt. Jacques Cartier is one of the most advanced and capable ships of its size and type in the world. Fully equipped to support Fisheries and Ocean scientists in the collection and analysis of data on Canada's marine ecosystems and the impacts of climate change, the vessel features a full suite of state-of-the-art systems, including high-tech fishing trawls and four science labs - a wet lab, a dry lab, an ocean lab and a control lab. The OFSV also has a drop keel, loaded with a wide array of sensors to support the vessel's research mandate.

From its home port in Atlantic Canada, the CCGS Capt. Jacques Cartier will also support search and rescue operations and environmental response. A third OFSV under construction at Seaspan Shipyards is structurally complete and on schedule to be delivered in August 2020. (Photo Seaspan)


 
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National Geographic Endurance leaves building dock

Le National Geographic Endurance quitte son quai de construction


2019-12-11

 

 

 

Lindblad Expeditions Holdings, a global player in expedition cruises and adventure travel experiences, celebrated the float out of National Geographic Endurance in Ulstein Verft, Norway, on December 7.

The National Geographic Endurance is the first of two polar vessels of the CX104 design from Ulstein. The hull was built in Poland by CRIST Wodowa Ship Yard and towed to Norway for final completion including mechanical installations and interior layouts.

The 124m long ship will comfortably accommodate 126 guests in 69 outside-facing cabins. Most cabins will feature small balconies with floor-to-ceiling sliding doors that bring in the spectacular views and ample natural light.

The vessel's patented X-BOW® is key to its design; its powerful wave-slicing action provides a smooth ride in adverse conditions, and even reduces spray on deck, for superior observation. Ulstein claim the ship will be more fuel efficient because of their patented design. As no details have been given on the ship's propulsion system, it is safe to assume it is conventional(low sulphur )diesel.

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Iceland creates a strict sulphur emissions control area

L'Islande crée une zone stricte de contrôle des émissions de soufre


2019-12-10

 

 

The Ministry for the Environment and Natural Resources of Iceland has enacted a strict sulphur emissions control area (SECA) whereby ships calling at the island starting next year will only be allowed to burn 0.1% sulphur content fuel.

The nation's minister for the environment and natural resources, Guðmundur Ingi Guðbrandsson, commented: "Vessels can use light types of oil fuel until they switch to other energy sources. I hope this will happen in the near future but heavy fuel oil is the filthiest; therefore it is extremely important to stop its use."

Vessels can, however, continue to burn heavy fuel oil (HFO)if they use approved emission abatement methods to reduce the release of sulphur dioxide, which prevents most sulphur emissions into the atmosphere along with soot pollution.

The Iceland Nature and Conservation Association and the Clean Arctic Alliance applaud Iceland's restrictions on sulphur emissions, but were quick to point out a «loophole» in the legislation given that some vessels will continue burning HFO by using scrubbers, including open-loop scrubbers which have predominantly been adopted.

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Port of Montreal using AI to improve flow of port trucking

Le port de Montréal utilise l'IA pour améliorer la fluidité du camionnage portuaire.


2019-12-10

 

 

Montreal, December 10, 2019 - The Montreal Port Authority (MPA) launched an upgrade of the Trucking PORTal application, which now includes predictive data on processing times at the Port of Montreal's various container terminals. This new tool helps port truck drivers plan their routes better and improve traffic flow on Port territory, thereby reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

The MPA teamed up with Element AI, a global supplier of artificial intelligence (AI) products, to develop, test and deploy this enhanced technological solution, which consists of a predictive model added to the Trucking PORTal app.

The new predictive dashboard shows average processing times at the various terminals for each 30-minute period over the next 24 hours. Quick Views are also available for the next three hours. This data is in addition to the real-time wait times on the terminals, information that has been available on the app since its launch in 2016.

Predictive data is made available by reading access cards using mainly RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) technology. These measures taken at four strategic locations on Port territory make it possible to collect data indicating current transaction times. The use and analysis of the results through AI algorithms then make it possible to model the predictive data. The resulting data then helps truck drivers better plan their trips to the Port.

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Global project launched to tackle plastic litter from ships and fisheries

Lancement d'un projet mondial contre les déchets plastiques provenant des navires et des pêcheries


2019-12-05

 

 

A new global project to prevent and reduce marine plastic litter from shipping and fisheries has been launched today (5 December) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Initial funding for the project is from the Government of Norway.

Plastic litter in the oceans is recognized as a major environmental problem. The GloLitter Partnerships Project aims to help shipping and fisheries move to a low-plastic future. GloLitter will assist developing countries identify opportunities to prevent and reduce marine litter, including plastic litter, from within the maritime transport and fisheries sectors, and to decrease the use of plastics in these industries, including identifying opportunities to re-use and recycle plastics.

The project will consider the availability and adequacy of port reception facilities; look at enhancing awareness of the marine plastics issue within the shipping and fisheries sectors, including seafarers and fishers; and encourage fishing gear to be marked so it can be traced back to its owner if discarded.

These and other actions to reduce plastic litter have already been identified in IMO's Action Plan to address marine plastic litter from ships, adopted in 2018.

The GloLitter project will develop guidance documents, training material and toolkits to help enforce existing regulations, including IMO's International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annex V. Since 1988, this has prohibited the discharge of plastics, including discarded fishing gear, into the sea from ships.

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