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Canadian ports assess global trade opportunities

2017-09-15

McKeil Marine's Evans Spirit  won the International Bulk Journal's 2016 Ship of the Year Award during the IBJ's Salute to Excellence in the Maritime Bulk Industry gala awards ceremony in London, UK on November 21.
"It's a fantastic way to closeout our 60th anniversary year: having a vessel named after our founder, Evans McKeil, win this prestigious international award," said Steve Fletcher, President and CEO of McKeil Marine.
Acquired by McKeil in 2015, the Evans Spirit is a cargo ship with the shallow draught characters of a tug and barge; however, compared to a tug-and-barge unit, she can transport approximately 40 per cent more cargo about 50 per cent faster on a very similar amount of fuel.  She is in service throughout the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.
Evans Spirit was shortlisted for 2016 Ship of the Year competing with three other vessels: CS Bright, Mitsui OSK Lines, Japan;  Damen Shipyards, Netherlands; and MN Baroque, Swiss Marine, Switzerland. The award is presented to the owner, operator or builder of an outstanding individual bulk ship. Judged on operational efficiency, design innovation, safety and environmental protection, the Evans Spirit was selected as winner. (Photo Paul Beesley).

VANCOUVER - With the ongoing renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the passing of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and significant investments in a national trade corridor fund, the importance of Canada's import and export markets has once again come to the fore, with Canadian ports at the centre of these new opportunities. 'Navigating a sustainable future' will be the theme of the 59th annual conference of the Association of Canadian Port Authorities, being staged in Vancouver September 18-20.

Canada's 18 Port Authorities are more than just key connection points on rapidly developing transport corridors - they shape and define the economic development and diversity of their cities and their regions.  They create good jobs, are the stable foundations of a thriving middle class and will be instrumental in all future trade deals.

"We welcome all our attendees to beautiful British Columbia this year," says Robin Silvester, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority.  "As a trading nation, Canadian Ports are on the front lines of all our trading opportunities and we must seize the moment to be a part of the future."

 

In Vancouver delegates will hear from speakers who will address the challenges in achieving sustainable port operations, with an emphasis on economic, environmental and social themes as they relate to Canada's ports and shipping community.  Sessions of note include Ports and Communities, Cybersecurity, Port Infrastructure Finance, and Environmental Protection.

Delegates will also get to experience the largest port in Canada, and the largest export port in North America.  The Port of Vancouver is home to 27 major marine cargo terminals and three Class 1 railroads and offers a full range of facilities and services to the international shipping community.

"In a rapidly evolving global economy, our port cities are quite simply where all the action is," says Wendy Zatylny, President of the Association of Canadian Port Authorities. "We have the opportunity to seize the strategic advantages our port authorities can provide, with their thought leadership in innovation and trade, so these cities can continue to sustainably thrive - now more than ever." (PHOTO VFPA)

 
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